actor

“You want to study human beings and tell stories that are 
relevant… We were always encouraged in drama school back when—and I 
got thrown out of drama school—we were always told that if you step on 
stage, you have to step on stage with a minimum of seven different 
characteristics. In order to
 transform, you had to have a physical silhouette and a vocal 
silhouette, and of course your inner tempo so you could really disguise 
yourself. From where I’m standing, there are two sides to acting. 
There’s camouflage, and there’s the hustle. The hustle is basically: 
“How am I going to get whatever it is I need, and what am I prepared to 
do in order to get it?”   Now, you can do that in your own accent 
and have a healthy career, just changing different hats, having a nice 
haircut, a nice suntan, a six-pack, and a set of great teeth. You can go
 a long way with that style of acting. Then there’s the other side, 
which is camouflage and says, “I put on a hat, a rubber nose, a cloak, 
put false teeth in, and I change my accent and walk with a limp.” You 
can take it all the way to Vaudevillian or surrealism or like Pixar to 
the green, motion-capture guys. I’ve always tried to hybrid the two 
together with the ability to have a foot in both camps, leaning on the 
strengths on one or the other at times, and I think if you only use your
 own voice, you can only have one shot at doing that, and then you’re 
done unless you make a career out of being you…   The paradox or 
irony here is that now I’m going to become Tom Hardy, the bloke who 
always does the silly voice. Someone will always want to put you in a 
box, and then you become the parody of yourself. The constant is, 
though, that I just want to make the effort to try and transform as much
 as possible from one character to another, so that people can immerse 
themselves into the story and not in my performance. That’s my job, 
isn’t it?“ -  Tom Hardy

“You want to study human beings and tell stories that are relevant… We were always encouraged in drama school back when—and I got thrown out of drama school—we were always told that if you step on stage, you have to step on stage with a minimum of seven different characteristics. In order to transform, you had to have a physical silhouette and a vocal silhouette, and of course your inner tempo so you could really disguise yourself. From where I’m standing, there are two sides to acting. There’s camouflage, and there’s the hustle. The hustle is basically: “How am I going to get whatever it is I need, and what am I prepared to do in order to get it?”

Now, you can do that in your own accent and have a healthy career, just changing different hats, having a nice haircut, a nice suntan, a six-pack, and a set of great teeth. You can go a long way with that style of acting. Then there’s the other side, which is camouflage and says, “I put on a hat, a rubber nose, a cloak, put false teeth in, and I change my accent and walk with a limp.” You can take it all the way to Vaudevillian or surrealism or like Pixar to the green, motion-capture guys. I’ve always tried to hybrid the two together with the ability to have a foot in both camps, leaning on the strengths on one or the other at times, and I think if you only use your own voice, you can only have one shot at doing that, and then you’re done unless you make a career out of being you…

The paradox or irony here is that now I’m going to become Tom Hardy, the bloke who always does the silly voice. Someone will always want to put you in a box, and then you become the parody of yourself. The constant is, though, that I just want to make the effort to try and transform as much as possible from one character to another, so that people can immerse themselves into the story and not in my performance. That’s my job, isn’t it?“ - Tom Hardy

‘Always leave the door open to allow life to enter the set.’ - Jean Renoir

‘Always leave the door open to allow life to enter the set.’ - Jean Renoir

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

Marc Maron’s WTF Podcast: Episode 655 - Daniel Radcliffe

‘Marc Maron interviewed actor Daniel Radcliffe on Monday, and starting soon after the one hour mark (like 1:01), Radcliffe talks about how his director for the film “Kill Your Darlings,” John Krokidas, gave him “this book Directing Actors.” And Radcliffe then proceeds to give a concise and truly killer explanation of exactly why and how verbs and objectives work so well for actors!’ - Judith Weston

Heath Ledger’s Joker Diary - Too Young To Die

Ridley [Scott] was a first-time director at one point. David Cronenberg the same. I’m always interested and looking for new talent, and so you do take a risk and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t. For me it’s important to keep that connection to the new talent that’s coming through as well as the talent that’s already established.
— Michael Fassbender

The Moment with Brian Koppelman - Edward Burns   Edward Burns, writer and filmmaker, on finding his creative voice, making compromises as an artist, and handling rejection like Kobe Bryant.

The Moment with Brian Koppelman - Edward Burns

Edward Burns, writer and filmmaker, on finding his creative voice, making compromises as an artist, and handling rejection like Kobe Bryant.

Theodore Melfi on what it’s like casting Bill Murray in a movie   “Oh god, that story’s so crazy,” says Melfi, laughing. “The nuts and bolts is (Murray) has no agent and manager, as everyone knows. You just call the 1-800 number. And I left, I don’t know, a dozen messages. It’s not his voice on there. It’s a Skytel voicemail with a menu. You have to record the message and send the message. It’s so confusing. I think if you can get through that and believe in it, he might call you back. I started calling once a week, and then sometimes once every two weeks so I didn’t annoy him. He never called back. I finally called his lawyer and said, ‘I’m trying reach Bill.’ And he goes, 'What number do you got?’ And I go, 'I’ve got the 800 number.’ And he goes, 'Well that’s what I got.’  "So I finally call his lawyer, it must have been at least six weeks later after all these messages. (The lawyer suggests Melfi write Murray a snail mail letter.) A 'Dear Bill’ letter. To a post office box back in New York. Two weeks later, (Murray) calls his attorney and goes, 'OK the letter was swell. I’d like to read the script. Have him snail mail a script.’ To another post office box on Martha’s Vineyard. Bill is a nomad. He’s never in one place for long.  "And so we snail-mailed a script. Bill calls two weeks later, he picks up the phone and calls my producer’s assistant (who is flabbergasted) and says, 'I never got that script.’ So we Fed Ex the script to a place in North Carolina. Two or three weeks after that, driving down the road I’m in the middle of a commercial job and my phone rings and he goes, 'Ted? It’s Bill Murray. Is this a good time?’  I pull over and he goes, 'Listen, I got this script of yours and I don’t know who you are. I don’t Google people. I don’t know who you are, what you do. Tell me about yourself.’ So that was 20 minutes of me stammering around trying to tell Bill Murray who I am. And he goes, 'Well, that sounds good.’ And this was on a Wednesday; I was shooting a commercial the next day. And he goes, 'Want to get together and have a coffee and talk about the script?’ I say, 'I’d love to.’ He goes, 'How about tomorrow?’ And I go, 'Well, it depends on what time, maybe …’ Bill goes, 'In New York.’ (Melfi was in L.A.) Bill goes, 'Oh. How about Friday?’ I say, 'Um, I don’t think I can get (to New York) on Friday. He says, 'No, in Cannes.’  Melfi laughs. ”'I say, 'No I can’t get to Cannes Friday, Bill, I’d have to leave today.’ He goes, 'Oh, well, you know it’s going to be a good time.’ (He was premiering Moonrise Kingdom.) But don’t worry about it, we’ll connect later. I’ll call you in a couple of weeks.’ (Melfi is now frantic.) I say, 'Bill, is there a better number for you, anything –’ He goes, 'No no, you’ve got the number.’ (The call ended and Murray disappeared.)  “I wanted to shoot myself. About three weeks later I’m in limbo, literally dying painfully. I’ve thrown my back out I’m so stressed out about the whole thing. It’s Sunday of Memorial Day weekend. I’m in bed at 8 a.m. and I get a text: Ted it’s Bill. Can you meet me at LAX in an hour? And I write back, Yeah I’ll be there! Murray: I’ll be at baggage claim, flight so-and-so.  "So I take a Vicodin and get in my car and I drive to LAX. I go to baggage claim and there’s a guy in a black rumpled suit holding a card that says 'B. Murray’ on it. I go, 'I think I’m with you.’ He says, 'Yeah?’ I think,oh god, he doesn’t know anything either. Bill Murray comes walking down the hall with his golf bag and goes, 'Ted? You want to talk about the script? Let’s go for a drive.’  So we get in this town car with this driver and we stop and get four In and Out grilled cheeses and two orders of fries. And he pulls out the script from his attaché case; it’s got dog-ears on it, some scratches here and there. And we drive from L.A. to three hours south at the Pechanga Indian reservation. I have no idea where I am or where I’m going. We drive and drive and drive. We end up at the back of this reservation on a golf course. He has a house there. We talk about the script the entire way.  "We pull into this house and he tours me around. He’s got tangelo trees and avocado growing next door. I used the bathroom. I go back outside and he goes, 'Alright, this is great. Do you think we should do it?’ (Melfi says he’d love to.) He goes, 'OK, we’re gonna do it. We’ll make the movie.’ I said, 'That’s so great Bill, just one thing, if you could do one thing for me. Could you tell someone other than me that this happened? No one is going to believe this story. I can’t possibly go to the studio and say Bill Murray said yes on the way to the Indian reservation in the back of a town car. Murray said, 'I’ll call someone, don’t worry about it.’ ”

Theodore Melfi on what it’s like casting Bill Murray in a movie

“Oh god, that story’s so crazy,” says Melfi, laughing. “The nuts and bolts is (Murray) has no agent and manager, as everyone knows. You just call the 1-800 number. And I left, I don’t know, a dozen messages. It’s not his voice on there. It’s a Skytel voicemail with a menu. You have to record the message and send the message. It’s so confusing. I think if you can get through that and believe in it, he might call you back. I started calling once a week, and then sometimes once every two weeks so I didn’t annoy him. He never called back. I finally called his lawyer and said, ‘I’m trying reach Bill.’ And he goes, 'What number do you got?’ And I go, 'I’ve got the 800 number.’ And he goes, 'Well that’s what I got.’

"So I finally call his lawyer, it must have been at least six weeks later after all these messages. (The lawyer suggests Melfi write Murray a snail mail letter.) A 'Dear Bill’ letter. To a post office box back in New York. Two weeks later, (Murray) calls his attorney and goes, 'OK the letter was swell. I’d like to read the script. Have him snail mail a script.’ To another post office box on Martha’s Vineyard. Bill is a nomad. He’s never in one place for long.

"And so we snail-mailed a script. Bill calls two weeks later, he picks up the phone and calls my producer’s assistant (who is flabbergasted) and says, 'I never got that script.’ So we Fed Ex the script to a place in North Carolina. Two or three weeks after that, driving down the road I’m in the middle of a commercial job and my phone rings and he goes, 'Ted? It’s Bill Murray. Is this a good time?’

I pull over and he goes, 'Listen, I got this script of yours and I don’t know who you are. I don’t Google people. I don’t know who you are, what you do. Tell me about yourself.’ So that was 20 minutes of me stammering around trying to tell Bill Murray who I am. And he goes, 'Well, that sounds good.’ And this was on a Wednesday; I was shooting a commercial the next day. And he goes, 'Want to get together and have a coffee and talk about the script?’ I say, 'I’d love to.’ He goes, 'How about tomorrow?’ And I go, 'Well, it depends on what time, maybe …’ Bill goes, 'In New York.’ (Melfi was in L.A.) Bill goes, 'Oh. How about Friday?’ I say, 'Um, I don’t think I can get (to New York) on Friday. He says, 'No, in Cannes.’

Melfi laughs. ”'I say, 'No I can’t get to Cannes Friday, Bill, I’d have to leave today.’ He goes, 'Oh, well, you know it’s going to be a good time.’ (He was premiering Moonrise Kingdom.) But don’t worry about it, we’ll connect later. I’ll call you in a couple of weeks.’ (Melfi is now frantic.) I say, 'Bill, is there a better number for you, anything –’ He goes, 'No no, you’ve got the number.’ (The call ended and Murray disappeared.)

“I wanted to shoot myself. About three weeks later I’m in limbo, literally dying painfully. I’ve thrown my back out I’m so stressed out about the whole thing. It’s Sunday of Memorial Day weekend. I’m in bed at 8 a.m. and I get a text: Ted it’s Bill. Can you meet me at LAX in an hour? And I write back, Yeah I’ll be there! Murray: I’ll be at baggage claim, flight so-and-so.

"So I take a Vicodin and get in my car and I drive to LAX. I go to baggage claim and there’s a guy in a black rumpled suit holding a card that says 'B. Murray’ on it. I go, 'I think I’m with you.’ He says, 'Yeah?’ I think,oh god, he doesn’t know anything either. Bill Murray comes walking down the hall with his golf bag and goes, 'Ted? You want to talk about the script? Let’s go for a drive.’

So we get in this town car with this driver and we stop and get four In and Out grilled cheeses and two orders of fries. And he pulls out the script from his attaché case; it’s got dog-ears on it, some scratches here and there. And we drive from L.A. to three hours south at the Pechanga Indian reservation. I have no idea where I am or where I’m going. We drive and drive and drive. We end up at the back of this reservation on a golf course. He has a house there. We talk about the script the entire way.

"We pull into this house and he tours me around. He’s got tangelo trees and avocado growing next door. I used the bathroom. I go back outside and he goes, 'Alright, this is great. Do you think we should do it?’ (Melfi says he’d love to.) He goes, 'OK, we’re gonna do it. We’ll make the movie.’ I said, 'That’s so great Bill, just one thing, if you could do one thing for me. Could you tell someone other than me that this happened? No one is going to believe this story. I can’t possibly go to the studio and say Bill Murray said yes on the way to the Indian reservation in the back of a town car. Murray said, 'I’ll call someone, don’t worry about it.’ ”

The Directors Series - Stanley Kubrick [1.3] THE PETER SELLERS COMEDIES

Part 3 of the DIRECTORS SERIES’ examination into the films and career of director Stanley Kubrick, covering his features in collaboration with actor Peter Sellers:
-LOLITA (1962)
-DR. STRANGELOVE: OR HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB (1964)

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Alex Garland with Oscar Isaac, Alicia Vikander and Domhnall Gleeson while filming Ex Machina (2015)

 pickledelephant:

Ethan Hawke Remembers Philip Seymour Hoffman and Robin Williams (February 6, 2015) | Charlie Rose

“Depression is a real demon in the woods for a lot of creative people, you know? It’s part of what the documentary is trying to be about for me, finding balance, where the beauty that is attainable in the creative arts can be matched with the scratchy roughness of regular life." 

- Ethan Hawke remembers Robin Williams and Philip Seymour Hoffman.

Arnold Schwarzenegger called it “a shitty film” on one occasion. Michael Biehn was unsure about coming on board because he thought the film sounded silly. James Cameron’s agent called his idea stupid, and Orion Pictures, the distributor, had little to no faith in the film’s commercial and critical success. And yet, Cameron insisted on going all the way with the project born as a vision that came to him in a fever-ridden dream. As they say, the rest is history. Starting from an idea immediately labeled as implausible, silly and that was unlikely to be done properly with the technology at disposal,   Terminator   turned into a science fiction and horror giant, launching director James Cameron’s career into the orbit, transforming Schwarzenegger into a deeply desired commodity, telling a story that would not only spawn a series of sequels, but ultimately change the way we observed the genre. Since 1984, the chronology of science fiction action films was defined as either before or after   Terminator  .   From our experience, seeing   Terminator   for the first time is like having your eyes opened and mind blown after years of blind boredom. One of a kind.  
    
  http://www.cinephiliabeyond.org/james-camerons-terminator-true-classic-powerful-influential-films-can-get/

Arnold Schwarzenegger called it “a shitty film” on one occasion. Michael Biehn was unsure about coming on board because he thought the film sounded silly. James Cameron’s agent called his idea stupid, and Orion Pictures, the distributor, had little to no faith in the film’s commercial and critical success. And yet, Cameron insisted on going all the way with the project born as a vision that came to him in a fever-ridden dream. As they say, the rest is history. Starting from an idea immediately labeled as implausible, silly and that was unlikely to be done properly with the technology at disposal, Terminator turned into a science fiction and horror giant, launching director James Cameron’s career into the orbit, transforming Schwarzenegger into a deeply desired commodity, telling a story that would not only spawn a series of sequels, but ultimately change the way we observed the genre. Since 1984, the chronology of science fiction action films was defined as either before or after TerminatorFrom our experience, seeing Terminator for the first time is like having your eyes opened and mind blown after years of blind boredom. One of a kind.

http://www.cinephiliabeyond.org/james-camerons-terminator-true-classic-powerful-influential-films-can-get/