montage

David Fincher: From a Distance

by @jacobtswinney

Swinney’s last David Fincher video examined the filmmaker’s use of the extreme close-up. It seemed only right that his follow-up video would do the opposite. Fincher’s use of the long/extreme long shot is something of beauty, lending a majestic sense of scale to his often cramped and grimy little worlds. Whether he employs the shot to communicate isolation, express magnitude, or even just to give us a much needed breath, Fincher’s approach to distancing us from his subjects is masterful.

FILMS USED:
Alien 3 (1992)
Se7en (1995)
The Game (1997)
Fight Club (1999)
Panic Room (2002)
Zodiac (2007)
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008)
The Social Network (2010)
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011)
Gone Girl (2014)

An Improbable Weapon Supercut

andyschneider.net
jonathanbritnell.com

Star Wars: True Detective Style - Star Wars Minute

First and Final Frames

from Jacob T. Swinney

What can we learn by examining only the first and final shot of a film?  This video plays the opening and closing shots of 55 films side-by-side.  Some of the opening shots are strikingly similar to the final shots, while others are vastly different–both serving a purpose in communicating various themes.  Some show progress, some show decline, and some are simply impactful images used to begin and end a film.

Films used (in order of appearance):
The Tree of Life 00:00
The Master 00:09
Brokeback Mountain 00:15
No Country for Old Men 00:23
Her 00:27
Blue Valentine 00:30
Birdman 00:34
Black Swan 00:41
Gone Girl 00:47
Kill Bill Vol. 2 00:53
Punch-Drunk Love 00:59
Silver Linings Playbook 01:06
Taxi Driver 01:11
Shutter Island 01:20
Children of Men 01:27
We Need to Talk About Kevin 01:33
Funny Games (2007) 01:41
Fight Club 01:47
12 Years a Slave 01:54
There Will be Blood 01:59
The Godfather Part II 02:05
Shame 02:10
Never Let Me Go 02:17
The Road 02:21
Hunger 02:27
Raging Bull 02:31
Cabaret 02:36
Before Sunrise 02:42
Nebraska 02:47
Frank 02:54
Cast Away 03:01
Somewhere 03:06
Melancholia 03:11
Morvern Callar 03:18
Take this Waltz 03:21
Buried 03:25
Lord of War 03:32
Cape Fear 03:38
12 Monkeys 03:45
The World According to Garp 03:50
Saving Private Ryan 03:57
Poetry 04:02
Solaris (1972) 04:05
Dr. Strangelove 04:11
The Astronaut Farmer 04:16
The Piano 04:21
Inception 04:26
Boyhood 04:31
Whiplash 04:37
Cloud Atlas 04:43
Under the Skin 04:47
2001: A Space Odyssey 04:51
Gravity 04:57
The Searchers 05:03
The Usual Suspects 05:23

David O. Russell and the Pursuit of Happiness 

The characters in David O. Russell’s films find happiness, but it’s usually hard-won. There’s always a fight involved. Some of these fights are between individuals. In American Hustle, as the struggle for business success involves deceiving others, and the struggle for romantic contentment involves the painful process by which two people rub the rough spots off of each other–or don’t. Some of these struggles take place within one’s self: in Silver Linings Playbook, a man has to master his unruly mind to achieve contentment–and then finds that that’s only half the battle. Some of these battles take place on every conceivable arena: in The Fighter, skirmishes take place on class lines, on physical lines, and on lines of lineage. This video homage by Frank Perez takes us through these battles fluidly and economically, preserving their intensity while reminding us that, in a sense, they are all part of the same eternal, nameless battle.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/pressplay/watch-how-david-o-russells-characters-find-happiness-a-video-essay-20150203

The ‘Best Picture’ Show: A Final Image Oscars Montage

The final shot from all 86 Best Picture winners.

Edited by Monté Patterson

2013 - “12 Years a Slave”
2012 - “Argo”
2011 - “The Artist”
2010 - “The King’s Speech”
2009 - “The Hurt Locker”
2008 - “Slumdog Millionaire”
2007 - “No Country for Old Men”
2006 - “The Departed”
2005 - “Crash”
2004 - “Million Dollar Baby”
2003 - “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King”
2002 - “Chicago”
2001 - “A Beautiful Mind”
2000 - “Gladiator”
1999 - “American Beauty”
1998 - “Shakespeare in Love”
1997 - “Titanic”
1996 - “The English Patient”
1995 - “Braveheart”
1994 - “Forrest Gump”
1993 - “Schindler’s List”
1992 - “Unforgiven”
1991 - “The Silence of the Lambs”
1990 - “Dances With Wolves”
1989 - “Driving Miss Daisy”
1988 - “Rain Man”
1987 - “The Last Emperor”
1986 - “Platoon”
1985 - “Out of Africa”
1984 - “Amadeus”
1983 - “Terms of Endearment”
1982 - “Gandhi”
1981 - “Chariots of Fire”
1980 - “Ordinary People”
1979 - “Kramer vs. Kramer”
1978 - “The Deer Hunter”
1977 - “Annie Hall”
1976 - “Rocky”
1975 - “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest”
1974 - “The Godfather Part II”
1973 - “The Sting”
1972 - “The Godfather”
1971 - “The French Connection”
1970 - “Patton”
1969 - “Midnight Cowboy”
1968 - “Oliver!”
1967 - “In the Heat of the Night”
1966 - “A Man for All Seasons”
1965 - “The Sound of Music”
1964 - “My Fair Lady”
1963 - “Tom Jones”
1962 - “Lawrence of Arabia”
1961 - “West Side Story”
1960 - “The Apartment”
1959 - “Ben-Hur”
1958 - “Gigi”
1957 - “The Bridge on the River Kwai”
1956 - “Around the World in 80 Days”
1955 - “Marty”
1954 - “On the Waterfront”
1953 - “From Here to Eternity”
1952 - “The Greatest Show on Earth”
1951 - “An American in Paris”
1950 - “All About Eve”
1949 - “All the Kings Men”
1948 - “Hamlet”
1947 - “Gentleman’s Agreement”
1946 - “The Best Years of Our Lives”
1945 - “The Lost Weekend”
1944 - “Going My Way”
1943 - “Casablanca”
1942 - “Mrs. Miniver”
1941 - “How Green Was My Valley”
1940 - “Rebecca”
1939 - “Gone with the Wind”
1938 - “You Can’t Take It with You”
1937 - “The Life of Emile Zola”
1936 - “The Great Ziegfeld”
1935 - “Mutiny on the Bounty”
1934 - “It Happened One Night”
1932/1933 - “Cavalcade”
1931/1932 - “Grand Hotel”
1930/1931 - “Cimarron”
1929/1930 - “All Quiet on the Western Front”
1928/1929 - “The Broadway Melody”
1927/1928 - “Wings”

finalimageblog.com

Things Are Not What They Seem

A video essay on title sequences from Hitchcock and Fincher films. An exploration of motion graphic design from analog to digital.

Red: A Kubrick Supercut

It’s funny how the colors of the real world only seem really real when you viddy them on the screen. - Alex DeLarge ‘A Clockwork Orange’