star wars

Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) // Original Trilogy (1977- 1983)

by Jorge Luengo Ruiz

A Star Odyssey    by  Naolito

A Star Odyssey

by Naolito

Star Wars: True Detective Style - Star Wars Minute

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A Long Time Ago, In A Cul De Sac Far Far Away…

The Sounds of Star Wars

TIE Fighter, short film

by Paul “OtaKing” Johnson

What if there was an Empire-focussed short Star Wars animation, drawn with the crazy detail and shading of classic 80s anime that’s all but vanished from Japan nowadays?

Drawn and animated by OtaKing over 4 years’ worth of weekends, with music by the living guitar solo Zak Rahman and sound design by up and coming audio technician Joseph Leyva. 

How STAR WARS can get back to it’s indie roots, or a boy can dream, can’t he?    Quick poll: Who else wants to see an indie Star Wars film?    Do you hear that? It’s the sound of all the air being sucked out of the room, more specifically, 
it’s the sound a Star Wars film makes when released. Since May of 1977, 
Star Wars has held a rare place in cinema; each time a film is released,
 it assumes total market dominance. The addition of solid leadership by 
superstar producer, Kathleen Kennedy, and the backing of Disney’s 
marketing machine means there is no end in sight for the franchise. This
 gives them great power, but as Luke’s new bunkmate Spiderman will tell 
you;   ‘With great power comes great responsibility.’   There are sequels and prequels and ‘stand alone’ plans, Han Solo origin story anyone? Certainly, we will have Star Wars films for years to come. That’s the good news.   The bad news?   Well, they’re all going to be giant tent pole films. Don’t get me wrong; I 
love a good CGI extravaganza as much as the next guy but isn’t it 
possible the fans could burn out on event after event? It seems to be 
working fine for Marvel (also acquired by Disney) and for Transformers, 
though the latter has a multi-year break between pictures.  Now,
 I could be totally wrong about this, but in celebration of Star Wars 
creator George Lucas, an indie filmmaker more interested in 
documentaries and tone poems (early music videos without the band, or 
the group, or sometimes the music) I’ve compiled a list of nine indie 
Star Wars films. They’re cheap to make and easy to sell. Why open one 
Star Wars film every year when you can open two?…   https://medium.com/@futurePratt/how-star-wars-can-get-back-to-its-indie-roots-or-a-boy-can-dream-cant-he-5b69a5f876d3

How STAR WARS can get back to it’s indie roots, or a boy can dream, can’t he?

Quick poll: Who else wants to see an indie Star Wars film?

Do you hear that? It’s the sound of all the air being sucked out of the room, more specifically, it’s the sound a Star Wars film makes when released. Since May of 1977, Star Wars has held a rare place in cinema; each time a film is released, it assumes total market dominance. The addition of solid leadership by superstar producer, Kathleen Kennedy, and the backing of Disney’s marketing machine means there is no end in sight for the franchise. This gives them great power, but as Luke’s new bunkmate Spiderman will tell you;

‘With great power comes great responsibility.’

There are sequels and prequels and ‘stand alone’ plans, Han Solo origin story anyone? Certainly, we will have Star Wars films for years to come. That’s the good news.

The bad news?

Well, they’re all going to be giant tent pole films. Don’t get me wrong; I love a good CGI extravaganza as much as the next guy but isn’t it possible the fans could burn out on event after event? It seems to be working fine for Marvel (also acquired by Disney) and for Transformers, though the latter has a multi-year break between pictures.

Now, I could be totally wrong about this, but in celebration of Star Wars creator George Lucas, an indie filmmaker more interested in documentaries and tone poems (early music videos without the band, or the group, or sometimes the music) I’ve compiled a list of nine indie Star Wars films. They’re cheap to make and easy to sell. Why open one Star Wars film every year when you can open two?…

https://medium.com/@futurePratt/how-star-wars-can-get-back-to-its-indie-roots-or-a-boy-can-dream-cant-he-5b69a5f876d3

Lucas’ Empire: Power of Story - Sundance Film Festival 15

“Why should we use all this equipment and all this stuff when we can make it better?” In this excerpt from a recent Sundance panel on “The Power of Story,” George Lucas once again attempts to explain how his loathing for the Hollywood apparatus led to the creation of a special effects empire that enabled a whole new super-strain of Hollywood blockbusters. In his narrative, Lucas had to create a special effects house because none existed, and he had to get into the toy licensing business to prolong the life of his movies inn the market place, and he had to create digital filmmaking because “I ripped up millions of sprocket holes” and thought there had to be a better process. The big paradox of Lucas’ career is how a Bruce Conner devotee helped birth pretty much the exact opposite. Here, as ever, he sounds reasonable in explaining his thinking and utterly disconnected from its inevitable result.

George Lucas On How He Built His $4 Billion ‘Star Wars’ Empire   ‘If you own the movie, which I came to do, you make a lot of money. But you have to own it, and that means you have to put the money in, so you have to take the risk.  I was talking to Ladd Jr. on the first Star Wars. I had 50 percent of the net profits because my company was going out and making the movie, and I said, “I know what I’m doing for my 50 percent. I put my heart and soul in this, my whole career is at stake, I have to actually go out and make the movie… What are you doing for your 50 percent?” He said, “Well, I provide the money.” I said, “You don’t provide the money! You go to a bank with a letter of credit and they supply the money, so you’re not doing anything! And you get 50 percent of the movie!”  So, I came back for The Empire Strikes Back and, instead of them giving me the boilerplate contract, I gave them the boilerplate contract. I went to my lawyer and I said, “You’re going to do a distribution contract from scratch.” He said, “Do you know how hard that is? That’s really a lot of work! It’s 180 pages!” And I said, “Look: How many chances are you ever gonna get to write a distribution agreement for a studio? Nobody’s ever done it, and nobody’s ever gonna do it again.” I went to Laddy and I said, “Here’s the deal. I’m going to finance the film this time.” And he said, “Well, wait a minute… you’re getting 100 percent of the profits!” And I said, “Yeah. I’m financing it! Remember that 50 percent you had? Well, I’m doing that now. You don’t get that 50 percent, and I get my own 50 percent, so I get 100 percent.”’

George Lucas On How He Built His $4 Billion ‘Star Wars’ Empire

‘If you own the movie, which I came to do, you make a lot of money. But you have to own it, and that means you have to put the money in, so you have to take the risk.

I was talking to Ladd Jr. on the first Star Wars. I had 50 percent of the net profits because my company was going out and making the movie, and I said, “I know what I’m doing for my 50 percent. I put my heart and soul in this, my whole career is at stake, I have to actually go out and make the movie… What are you doing for your 50 percent?” He said, “Well, I provide the money.” I said, “You don’t provide the money! You go to a bank with a letter of credit and they supply the money, so you’re not doing anything! And you get 50 percent of the movie!”

So, I came back for The Empire Strikes Back and, instead of them giving me the boilerplate contract, I gave them the boilerplate contract. I went to my lawyer and I said, “You’re going to do a distribution contract from scratch.” He said, “Do you know how hard that is? That’s really a lot of work! It’s 180 pages!” And I said, “Look: How many chances are you ever gonna get to write a distribution agreement for a studio? Nobody’s ever done it, and nobody’s ever gonna do it again.” I went to Laddy and I said, “Here’s the deal. I’m going to finance the film this time.” And he said, “Well, wait a minute… you’re getting 100 percent of the profits!” And I said, “Yeah. I’m financing it! Remember that 50 percent you had? Well, I’m doing that now. You don’t get that 50 percent, and I get my own 50 percent, so I get 100 percent.”’

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Kermit the Frog and Miss Piggy’s surprise visit to the set of “The Empire Strikes Back”, 1979