future

The Future of Movies Will Be More Latino   When Instructions Not Included, the Mexican breakout hit that quickly became the U.S.’s highest-grossing Spanish-language film ever, was released over Labor Day weekend in 2013, it was written about with mild surprise, the way that successful movies starring predominantly black casts are often categorized as unexpected hits. The movie debuted in fifth place with $10 million on the back of its social-media-savvy director-star Eugenio Derbez and did extremely well in Texas and California, both states with heavy Mexican populations.  It was a wonderful example of the power of one segment of the “Latino market,” which is a diverse collection of many different nationalities, as opposed to the single bloc that it is often portrayed as. Yet, at major Hollywood studios and production companies, Latino representation is shockingly low. We’ll cede the floor for a minute to Chris Rock, who addressed the issue in last week’s Hollywood Reporter cover story about race and the movie industry.   “You’re telling me no Mexicans are qualified to do anything at a studio? Really? Nothing but mop up? What are the odds that that’s true? The odds are, because people are people, that there’s probably a Mexican David Geffen mopping up for somebody’s company right now. The odds are that there’s probably a Mexican who’s that smart who’s never going to be given a shot. And it’s not about being given a shot to greenlight a movie because nobody is going to give you that — you’ve got to take that.” - Chris Rock   It’s a sad state right now, but the future of movies will be more Latino. Currently, Latinos make up 17 percent of the nation’s population and bought 25 percent of movie tickets in 2013. They make up a third of the nation’s frequent moviegoers, defined as people who attend movies at least once a month. Yet, in the last six years, only 4.9 percent of the characters in Hollywood’s biggest movies were Latino, according to a USC study released in August. Most projections say Latinos will make up 29 percent of the U.S. population by 2050.  Those are the kind of numbers studios notice. “It’s glacial, but it’s happening,” says Manny Alfaro, executive director of the Hispanic Organization of Latino Actors. Over the past several years, there are signs that Hollywood is including more Latinos, even if the statistics remain dire. Among those signs are increased marketing in Spanish-language media, major studio releases with heavy Latino casts and themes (Halloween’s animated The Book of Life, for example), and in at least one case, the hiring of an executive tasked with “focusing on projects driven by diverse filmmakers.”…   http://www.vulture.com/2014/12/future-of-movies-will-be-more-latino.html

The Future of Movies Will Be More Latino

When Instructions Not Included, the Mexican breakout hit that quickly became the U.S.’s highest-grossing Spanish-language film ever, was released over Labor Day weekend in 2013, it was written about with mild surprise, the way that successful movies starring predominantly black casts are often categorized as unexpected hits. The movie debuted in fifth place with $10 million on the back of its social-media-savvy director-star Eugenio Derbez and did extremely well in Texas and California, both states with heavy Mexican populations.

It was a wonderful example of the power of one segment of the “Latino market,” which is a diverse collection of many different nationalities, as opposed to the single bloc that it is often portrayed as. Yet, at major Hollywood studios and production companies, Latino representation is shockingly low. We’ll cede the floor for a minute to Chris Rock, who addressed the issue in last week’s Hollywood Reporter cover story about race and the movie industry.

“You’re telling me no Mexicans are qualified to do anything at a studio? Really? Nothing but mop up? What are the odds that that’s true? The odds are, because people are people, that there’s probably a Mexican David Geffen mopping up for somebody’s company right now. The odds are that there’s probably a Mexican who’s that smart who’s never going to be given a shot. And it’s not about being given a shot to greenlight a movie because nobody is going to give you that — you’ve got to take that.” - Chris Rock

It’s a sad state right now, but the future of movies will be more Latino. Currently, Latinos make up 17 percent of the nation’s population and bought 25 percent of movie tickets in 2013. They make up a third of the nation’s frequent moviegoers, defined as people who attend movies at least once a month. Yet, in the last six years, only 4.9 percent of the characters in Hollywood’s biggest movies were Latino, according to a USC study released in August. Most projections say Latinos will make up 29 percent of the U.S. population by 2050.

Those are the kind of numbers studios notice. “It’s glacial, but it’s happening,” says Manny Alfaro, executive director of the Hispanic Organization of Latino Actors. Over the past several years, there are signs that Hollywood is including more Latinos, even if the statistics remain dire. Among those signs are increased marketing in Spanish-language media, major studio releases with heavy Latino casts and themes (Halloween’s animated The Book of Life, for example), and in at least one case, the hiring of an executive tasked with “focusing on projects driven by diverse filmmakers.”…

http://www.vulture.com/2014/12/future-of-movies-will-be-more-latino.html

We Can Now Build Autonomous Killing Machines. And That’s a Very, Very Bad Idea   Clearpath Robotics was founded six years ago by three college buddies with a passion for building stuff. Its 80 employees specialize in all-terrain test rigs like the Husky, a stout four-wheeled robot vehicle used by researchers within the Department of Defense. They make drones too, and have even built a robotic boat called the Kingfisher. But there is one thing they will never, ever build: a robot that can kill.  Clearpath is the first and, so far as we can tell, only robotics company to pledge not to build killer robots. The decision, made last year, was simple, says co-founder and CTO Ryan Gariepy, and in fact it’s even helped the company recruit robot experts who’ve been drawn to Clearpath’s unique ethical stance. That’s because ethical questions are becoming a pressing matter for companies that build robotics systems. You see, we’re already at the dawn of the age of killer robots. And we’re completely unprepared for them…     http://www.wired.com/2015/02/can-now-build-autonomous-killing-machines-thats-bad-idea

We Can Now Build Autonomous Killing Machines. And That’s a Very, Very Bad Idea

Clearpath Robotics was founded six years ago by three college buddies with a passion for building stuff. Its 80 employees specialize in all-terrain test rigs like the Husky, a stout four-wheeled robot vehicle used by researchers within the Department of Defense. They make drones too, and have even built a robotic boat called the Kingfisher. But there is one thing they will never, ever build: a robot that can kill.

Clearpath is the first and, so far as we can tell, only robotics company to pledge not to build killer robots. The decision, made last year, was simple, says co-founder and CTO Ryan Gariepy, and in fact it’s even helped the company recruit robot experts who’ve been drawn to Clearpath’s unique ethical stance. That’s because ethical questions are becoming a pressing matter for companies that build robotics systems. You see, we’re already at the dawn of the age of killer robots. And we’re completely unprepared for them…

http://www.wired.com/2015/02/can-now-build-autonomous-killing-machines-thats-bad-idea